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Indigenous Instruments

$20.00

Description

ACM’s last concert of the season pairs Steven Mackey’s piece Indigenous Instruments with three pieces combining western instruments with actual indigenous instruments from around the world.

The concert features Peter Sculthorpe’s String Quartet No. 12 “From Ubirr” for digeridoo and string quartet, Jade for string quartet and pipa by Zhu Jian’er and Paul Moravec’s masterful Shakuhachi Quintet for shakuhachi and string quartet.

The concert features three renowned soloists: Tim Pocelli on digeridoo, Yang Wei, a founding member of Yo-Yo Ma’s Silk Road Ensemble, on pipa, and world-renowned shakuhachi player James Nyoraku Schlefer.

Don’t miss this concert!

DETAILS
Monday, May 13 7:00 PM
Davis Theater
4614 N. Lincoln Ave.
$20, $12 students (door only with ID)

PROGRAM
Indigenous Instruments by Steven Mackey
String Quartet No. 12 “From Ubirr” by Peter Sculthorpe
Jade by Zhu Jian-er
Shakuhachi Quintet by Paul Moravec

PROGRAM NOTES

Indigenous Instruments
String Quartet No. 12 “From Ubirr”
Jade
Shakuhachi Quintet

 

Indigenous Instruments by Steven Mackey
Indigenous Instruments is vernacular music from a culture that doesn't actually exist. I fantasized about a culture and their uses for music, did thought experiments to invent the kind of instruments they might play, and wrote "folk melodies" idiomatic to those instruments.

The exercise was silly but did in fact succeed in leading me to sounds and textures that I would never have thought of in my mode as a serious concert-music composer.

My starting point was to re-tune or de-tune the ensemble; the cello has a radical microtonal scordatura, the violin's G string is tuned down an octave and a quarter tone, the flute is pulled out a quarter-tone flat, and one note of the piano is prepared.

String Quartet No. 12 "From Ubirr by Peter Sculthorpe
Ubirr is a large rocky outcrop in Kakadu National Park, in northern Australia. It houses some of the best and most varied Aboriginal rock painting in the country. Many of the paintings have been proved to be the earliest-known graphic expressions of the human race. They demonstrate a caring relationship with the environment, and the Aboriginal belief that the land owns the people, not the people own the land.

The music of 'From Ubirr' asks us to attune ourselves to the planet, to listen to the cry of the earth as the Aborigines have done for many thousands of years. The work is a straightforward and melodious one. Its four parts are made up of quick, ritualistic music framed by slower music of a supplicatory nature, and an extended coda. The slow music is accompanied by a didjeridu pitched to 'Db', and the quick music by a second didjeridu pitched to 'A'. The instrument represents the sound of nature, of the earth itself.

String Quartet No. 12 "From Ubirr by Peter Sculthorpe
Ubirr is a large rocky outcrop in Kakadu National Park, in northern Australia. It houses some of the best and most varied Aboriginal rock painting in the country. Many of the paintings have been proved to be the earliest-known graphic expressions of the human race. They demonstrate a caring relationship with the environment, and the Aboriginal belief that the land owns the people, not the people own the land.

The music of 'From Ubirr' asks us to attune ourselves to the planet, to listen to the cry of the earth as the Aborigines have done for many thousands of years. The work is a straightforward and melodious one. Its four parts are made up of quick, ritualistic music framed by slower music of a supplicatory nature, and an extended coda. The slow music is accompanied by a didjeridu pitched to 'Db', and the quick music by a second didjeridu pitched to 'A'. The instrument represents the sound of nature, of the earth itself.

Indigenous Instruments by Steven Mackey
Indigenous Instruments is vernacular music from a culture that doesn't actually exist. I fantasized about a culture and their uses for music, did thought experiments to invent the kind of instruments they might play, and wrote "folk melodies" idiomatic to those instruments.

The exercise was silly but did in fact succeed in leading me to sounds and textures that I would never have thought of in my mode as a serious concert-music composer.

My starting point was to re-tune or de-tune the ensemble; the cello has a radical microtonal scordatura, the violin's G string is tuned down an octave and a quarter tone, the flute is pulled out a quarter-tone flat, and one note of the piano is prepared.

String Quartet No. 12 "From Ubirr by Peter Sculthorpe
Ubirr is a large rocky outcrop in Kakadu National Park, in northern Australia. It houses some of the best and most varied Aboriginal rock painting in the country. Many of the paintings have been proved to be the earliest-known graphic expressions of the human race. They demonstrate a caring relationship with the environment, and the Aboriginal belief that the land owns the people, not the people own the land.

The music of 'From Ubirr' asks us to attune ourselves to the planet, to listen to the cry of the earth as the Aborigines have done for many thousands of years. The work is a straightforward and melodious one. Its four parts are made up of quick, ritualistic music framed by slower music of a supplicatory nature, and an extended coda. The slow music is accompanied by a didjeridu pitched to 'Db', and the quick music by a second didjeridu pitched to 'A'. The instrument represents the sound of nature, of the earth itself.

String Quartet No. 12 "From Ubirr by Peter Sculthorpe
Ubirr is a large rocky outcrop in Kakadu National Park, in northern Australia. It houses some of the best and most varied Aboriginal rock painting in the country. Many of the paintings have been proved to be the earliest-known graphic expressions of the human race. They demonstrate a caring relationship with the environment, and the Aboriginal belief that the land owns the people, not the people own the land.

The music of 'From Ubirr' asks us to attune ourselves to the planet, to listen to the cry of the earth as the Aborigines have done for many thousands of years. The work is a straightforward and melodious one. Its four parts are made up of quick, ritualistic music framed by slower music of a supplicatory nature, and an extended coda. The slow music is accompanied by a didjeridu pitched to 'Db', and the quick music by a second didjeridu pitched to 'A'. The instrument represents the sound of nature, of the earth itself.